Family’s Role in Boosting Mental Health in Women with PCOS

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is a relatively common condition in women, with at least 1 in 5 women being diagnosed with the condition. It’s a hormonal disorder in which a woman’s body secretes extra male hormones called androgens. It is common among women of reproductive age. Women with PCOS may have infrequent or prolonged menstrual […]

Posted on July 27, 2022 ·

BY Team Veera

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Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is a relatively common condition in women, with at least 1 in 5 women being diagnosed with the condition. It’s a hormonal disorder in which a woman’s body secretes extra male hormones called androgens.

It is common among women of reproductive age. Women with PCOS may have infrequent or prolonged menstrual periods or fail to regularly release eggs or have several mental health issues.

How does PCOS Affect the Mental Health of Women?

PCOS is a complex disorder that affects many aspects of a woman’s health, including their mental health. If your loved one is going through this, here are some things that might help you to understand what they are possibly going through:

  • Anxiety and depression are almost three times as common in PCOS patients than in the general population. This can be one of the symptoms of PCOS caused due to the hormonal imbalance in the body.
  • PCOS is also said to be associated with an increased risk of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), bipolar disorders, and eating disorders.
  • Some PCOS sufferers express frustration and anxiety over their infertility, weight, excessive body and facial hair, or lack of control over their health and bodies which affects their mental health.
  • Premenstrual syndrome, according to some affected women, feels like it lasts the entire month.
  • PCOS causes acne, skin tags, and darkening of the skin, these may be physical symptoms but they also affect the mental health of a woman by making her feel insecure and anxious about herself.
  • PCOS has also been known to cause sleep problems among women.

There is no denying that PCOS takes a physical and emotional toll on a woman’s body, however, the vast majority of women with PCOS live perfectly normal lives and the disorder is not lethal nor intrinsically harmful to them.

While hearing that your sister or mother or wife has PCOS can be scary, it is important for you to offer them the needful mental support in this journey.

Supporting Your Loved One in Fighting PCOS:

You should first familiarise yourself with PCOS and what it means for your relationship. Spend some time learning about the condition’s many symptoms and how they can impact her physical and mental health by reading books and conducting online research.

There are several strategies to manage these symptoms; food, exercise, vitamins, and medicine can all help with polycystic ovaries. Consider how you may support your partner in incorporating each of these into her daily life as you take the time to learn about each one.

Let’s take a look at some of the things you can do that will help you and your loved one in fighting PCOS:

Attend Medical Appointments Together

Women with PCOS frequently visit multiple doctors, ranging from their regular GP to a specialist or gynecologist.

Take the time to accompany her to any appointments because going to the doctor or the hospital is never something to look forward to.

Make Lifestyle Changes Together

Making diverse lifestyle modifications, such as beginning an exercise program or adjusting your food, is one of the most natural approaches to controlling PCOS.

Provide Emotional Support

Numerous physical symptoms are associated with PCOS, but it can also have an impact on a person’s welfare and mental health.

You must be sensitive to any mood changes because stress, worry, and sadness are common among women with PCOS. Make sure she knows you’re available to listen if she needs to talk.

Discuss Fertility Issues

Fertility levels are frequently impacted by PCOS, which can be very stressful and distressing. Make sure you’re willing to discuss the issue and that she understands she is not the only one who is dealing with it.

You might also think about scheduling some sessions with a therapist and going to them together; having a private, non-judgmental setting would be very helpful for the family.

If your loved one has PCOS, she may very well feel discouraged, but the journey is a lot easier to handle with a supportive family.

Try to think of the “silver linings” in your loved one’s situation as often as you can. Although managing a chronic illness can be difficult, it can also help you talk more deeply than you could otherwise. Consider how to approach your loved one about PCOS now that you are aware of some of the fundamentals of PCOS that were covered in this article.

At Veera, we are dedicated towards reversing PCOS for life with our science-backed program that is accessible and affordable to all.

Get started to see the difference for yourself.

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